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What's the role of a UX designer?

I asked some UX designers: In one or two sentences, what do you believe is the role of a UX designer at a company?

Here are their answers, ordered by how many years they've been a UX designer, from fewest to most.

To make sure the product is as easy to use as possible for its target users
A UX designer brings the user to the table. Through research, iteration, and testing, the UX designer will craft experiences that are optimal for both the user and the business.
Role of a UX designer is to improve (and advocate for) the user's experience with the product (which completes tasks for the user) from onboarding to customer service while working with physical and business constraints.
A UX designer, aside from doing research and design work to inform new products/features in a company, should also evangelize UX to make everyone in the organisation more UX mature. This can be through regular stakeholder meetings, workshops, process overviews and such.
I believe the UX designer’s role is to be helping to lead the direction the product is going. By making sure the user is thought of as much if not more than the business side of it.
It is different in each business of course, but I think that the role of the UX Designer should be to guide and inform decision-making so that it is focused on understanding people, which is a requirement for helping people. Reliably helping people in this context means that you’re providing products and services that meet or exceed their needs and expectations.
The role of a UX designer is to bridge the gap between creative, business needs, and the user—using research, understanding psychology, and existing best practices.
In a nutshell, to humanise technology in a way that makes a business successful. To make products and services usable, enjoyable, and accessible for people, through research, design and testing, while considering user and business needs.
To be an advocate for the user needs first and foremost, but also to be a teacher for colleagues about the importance of the user experience.
Over the past years I went from believing the designer is the gatekeeper of good design, to the designer is the facilitator of good design. I also believe designers should be equally involved in deciding what thing to design as others like product management or executives.
A UX designer is responsible for mapping, analyzing and updating the user’s journey via qualitative and quantitative research methods in order to create personas, user stories and find areas where the product may need to adapt to the way users are intending to use it and provide solutions to said friction.
The most important role of a UX designer is to ensure good usability of whatever thing or service we work on in accordance with ISO 9241s definition of usability, i.e. ”The effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction with which specified users achieve specified goals in particular environments.” How we do that might vary, but that we do it should not. We should, of course, keep the business in mind, but we are there as advocates for the users which is something we shouldn’t forget.
The Default Mode of organisations is building The Wrong Thing and/or building The Thing Wrong. A UX designer’s role is to help their organisation grow slowly better at accepting the Default Mode and at escaping from it. Typical progression starts with not building The Thing Wrong and gradually extends to not building The Wrong Thing.
Work on creating the optimal experience for end-users that makes sense business-wise, together with researchers, evaluators, program/product/project managers, front- and back-end developers, quality assurance, subject matter experts, content writers, copy writers, documentation writers, strategists, A/B testers, marketeers, design system developers, and other stakeholders. This may include evangelizing UX, contributing to roadmaps, product visions, design strategies, information architecture, wireframes, content/copy inventories and plans, usability test plans and execution, A/B versions for testing, functional specifications, design system components, design critiques, design presentations and reviews, design principles, competitive analyses, scoping workshops, concept diagrams, refining backlogs and participating in other agile ceremonies, and teaching/writing/presenting about the work for the benefit of the UX community.

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